Scrum: Lessons from #leancoffee for team communication

As most Agilists know #leancoffee is a savvy and simple technique that we use to facilitate a session  focusing on top priority items first / and time boxing  conversations.

To the group that met last week in Geekdom, #leancoffee was new. And to some of them Agile was also new, and the “Aha” moments experienced by Rob were the best of all

Everyone wrote the topic they wanted to discuss on individual sticky notes.

And then we went around the circle briefly introducing / describing their topic of interest

Rob went last. And he seemed quite disappointed. “I don’t even have to speak about my topics, others have already spoken about it”.

I was planning on discussing the theory behind ‘visibility and the work place’ and why sessions like these get us into the habit of practicing them but Rob provided me an opportunity to speak sooner:

“Rob, that is exactly why we write our topics down. Everyone gets to make their topic of interest visible.  It is okay that you went last, but that does not mean your ideas are least valuable, or you didn’t get to introduce, or didn’t think about what you wanted to discuss and why you prioritized.”

“In old fashioned meetings, many folks don’t say anything, because someone spoke about their topic. Unfortunately, sometimes it creates a reputation that they have nothing to say. And those folks who spoke first, they continue dominating  future meetings as well.  What we are doing today, is to make an individuals thought process visible and allow everyone to see (notice) first hand their interest. Now if someone has already introduced your topic, when it is your turn, you can make everyone aware that was your interest as well and add on to it. ”

“And if your topic did not get voted up, then you and the other person who wanted to discuss the same can meet later”

We then proceeded to dot vote, and complete #leancoffee.

 

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LeanCoffee @Geekdom

Team communication is all about being heard, listening and understanding the flow of work, and how it fits together. It is about “not living in the head”, but making  thoughts visible, inviting immediate feedback, allowing the thought process  to change, and the team adjusting to the new thought process;

In Agile projects communication is not about conveying or exchanging information. It is about creating opportunities to be understood; It is about developing earliest possible moments to “sense”; it is about paying attention to the signals that are available, and working on them at the appropriate moment

 

 

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